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Titanium is light, corrosion-resistant and is virtually maintenance-free making it good news for the crew! ” INTERIOR MATERIALS Inside a yacht’s living spaces, wood becomes problematic again, but for a different reason. “Yachts are getting bigger. When they reach a certain size, or if they carry more than 12 guests, they will fall under the Passenger Yacht Code,” explains Ray Steele. “This has big implications for the choice of materials, because your yacht has to meet the same fire safety standards as a Passenger Vessel.” The Burgess TCS team has been part of the panel developing the new Code, which gives them a direct insight into the regulations. “On a cruise ship, you can use fireproof materials looking much like formica,” says Rory Boyle. “But our clients require specially tanned leathers, alligator skin, crushed oystershell, or fine rosewood – formica just won’t do!” TCS, interior contractors and designers have to go through a lengthy process of sourcing materials certified to comply with rules that specify the maximum levels of combustible material in each interior space. Fire testing literally means setting fire to something and measuring the energy, smoke and fumes released as it burns. Obviously that is not practical with very rare or unique items. Nor is it always feasible to apply fire-retardant treatment to unusual textiles and furnishings, where lustre, colour and quality are all important. This requires a continual refinement of calculations and juggling of kilojoules. If a designer insists on a solid wooden handrail for a staircase, then perhaps you use stainless steel for the toe treads, to reduce the overall combustibility of the space. “The key is to eliminate as much combustible material as possible behind the scenes,” says Boyle. “The basic substrate of large yacht interiors used to be wood. Now under Passenger Ship regulations it is non-combustible board or aluminium honeycomb.” As ever, necessity is the mother of invention. The new rules are pushing the use of new techniques and new materials. The raw silk panelling in the master suite is backed onto Nomex, not plywood. The bar feels like solid oak, in fact it’s 2/3 aluminium, and that’s a high quality printed ‘trompe-l’oeil’ panel behind the bar. “The focus is on those areas where there is direct interface with the owner and guests,” says Sean Bianchi. “Most of the effort that goes into fire safety compliance should be invisible to them.” As Rory Boyle puts it: “What is the calorific value of a Picasso? If you want to have an ancient flag from HMS Victory in the main saloon, or that wonderful piece of driftwood from Tahiti, of course you can. It’s our job to make sure that it’s possible.” Total length of yachts currently under construction/ development with Burgess Where Burgess has worked on new build projects since 2001 Total value of projects currently under construction/ development with Burgess Number of Burgess megayacht projects, three of which are currently under construction The largest yacht ever built in Holland, for which Burgess has been appointed project managers 1070m 23 shipyards €1.8 billion 4 Passenger Yacht Code vessels 110m THE LATEST SUPERYACHT DELIVERY FROM BURGESS TCS Delivered in 2012 by Devonport Yachts (now Pendennis Plus), the 96m VAVA II is the largest private yacht ever built in the UK. All technical aspects of the build from conception to delivery were supervised by Burgess TCS, including extensive studies on noise and vibration. VAVA II has a multitude of unique features, including state-of-the-art bridge systems with full dynamic positioning, an innovative glass elevator, a variable depth swimming pool, a private helideck with refuelling facilities and what is probably the largest water level beach club afloat. Built to the very highest specification and to the Passenger Yacht Code, VAVA II sets a new benchmark in superyacht construction, safety and design. technical consultancy services { 30 }


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